John Seamon

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"John Seamon"
Mean distance: 14.4 (cluster 23)
 
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David A. Gallo research assistant
Xue Sun research assistant 2007-2008 Wesleyan
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Publications

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Seamon JG, Moskowitz TN, Swan AE, et al. (2014) SenseCam reminiscence and action recall in memory-unimpaired people. Memory (Hove, England). 22: 861-6
Seamon JG, Bohn JM, Coddington IE, et al. (2012) Can survival processing enhance story memory? Testing the generalizability of the adaptive memory framework. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 38: 1045-56
Seamon JG, Punjabi PV, Busch EA. (2010) Memorising Milton's Paradise lost: a study of a septuagenarian exceptional memoriser. Memory (Hove, England). 18: 498-503
Seamon JG, Blumenson CN, Karp SR, et al. (2009) Did we see someone shake hands with a fire hydrant?: collaborative recall affects false recollections from a campus walk. The American Journal of Psychology. 122: 235-47
Sun X, Punjabi PV, Greenberg LT, et al. (2009) Does feigning amnesia impair subsequent recall? Memory & Cognition. 37: 81-9
Gordon RJ, Seamon JG, Pearlson GD. (2009) An fMRI study of neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia with a mere exposure paradigm. Schizophrenia Research. 108: 290-2
Cotel SC, Gallo DA, Seamon JG. (2008) Evidence that nonconscious processes are sufficient to produce false memories. Consciousness and Cognition. 17: 210-8
Seamon JG, Philbin MM, Harrison LG. (2006) Do you remember proposing marriage to the Pepsi machine? False recollections from a campus walk. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. 13: 752-6
Seamon JG, Berko JR, Sahlin B, et al. (2006) Can false memories spontaneously recover? Memory (Hove, England). 14: 415-23
Sahlin BH, Harding MG, Seamon JG. (2005) When do false memories cross language boundaries in English-Spanish bilinguals? Memory & Cognition. 33: 1414-21
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