Neil W. Mulligan

Affiliations: 
Psychology University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 
Area:
Cognitive Psychology
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Publications

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West JT, Mulligan NW. (2020) Investigating the replicability and boundary conditions of the mnemonic advantage for disgust. Cognition & Emotion. 1-21
Picklesimer ME, Buchin ZL, Mulligan NW. (2019) The Effect of Retrieval Practice on Transitive Inference. Experimental Psychology. 66: 377-392
Mulligan NW, Buchin ZL, West JT. (2019) Assessing why the testing effect is moderated by experimental design. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Buchin ZL, Mulligan NW. (2019) The testing effect under divided attention: Educational application. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
Buchin ZL, Mulligan NW. (2019) Divided attention and the encoding effects of retrieval. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006). 1747021819847141
West JT, Mulligan NW. (2019) Prospective metamemory, like retrospective metamemory, exhibits underconfidence with practice. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Mulligan NW, Smith SA, Buchin ZL. (2018) The generation effect and experimental design. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Buchin ZL, Mulligan NW. (2017) The Testing Effect Under Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Spataro P, Mulligan NW, Bechi Gabrielli G, et al. (2016) Divided attention enhances explicit but not implicit conceptual memory: an item-specific account of the attentional boost effect. Memory (Hove, England). 1-6
Susser JA, Jin A, Mulligan NW. (2016) Identity priming consistently affects perceptual fluency but only affects metamemory when primes are obvious. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 42: 657-62
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