Robert Elliott Johnston

Affiliations: 
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States 
Area:
Behavioral Neuroendocrinology
Website:
http://people.psych.cornell.edu/~rej1/index.html
Google:
"Robert Elliott Johnston"
Bio:

(1942 - 2014)
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2015/01/psychology-professor-robert-elliott-johnston-dies-72

Mean distance: 13.46 (cluster 19)
 
SNBCP

Parents

Sign in to add mentor
Carl Pfaffmann grad student 1970 Rockefeller
 (Scent marking, olfactory communication and social behavior in the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus.)

Children

Sign in to add trainee
Alex B. LaVenture research assistant 2007-2009 Cornell
Aras Petrulis grad student Cornell
Emilie Rissman grad student Cornell
Wen-Sung Lai grad student 1998-2003 Cornell
Kevin G. Bath grad student 2000-2005 Cornell
Samantha C. Larimer Bousquet grad student 2007 Cornell
Erik R. Patel grad student 2012 Cornell
Marcela Fernández-Vargas grad student 2008-2015
Michael H. Ferkin post-doc Cornell
Jill M. Mateo post-doc Cornell
Javier d. delBarco-Trillo post-doc 2006- Cornell
BETA: Related publications

Publications

You can help our author matching system! If you notice any publications incorrectly attributed to this author, please sign in and mark matches as correct or incorrect.

Fernández-Vargas M, Johnston RE. (2015) Ultrasonic vocalizations in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) reveal modest sex differences and nonlinear signals of sexual motivation. Plos One. 10: e0116789
Place NJ, Vernon DM, Johnston RE. (2014) Reduced mate preference for dominant over subordinate males in old female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Behavioural Processes. 108: 166-72
Delbarco-Trillo J, Johnston RE. (2013) Interactions with heterospecific males do not affect how female Mesocricetus hamsters respond to conspecific males. Animal Behaviour. 86: 151-156
delBarco-Trillo J, Johnston RE. (2012) Asymmetric learning to avoid heterospecific males in Mesocricetus hamsters. Zoology (Jena, Germany). 115: 270-4
Delbarco-Trillo J, Johnston RE. (2011) Adult female hamsters require long and sustained exposures to heterospecific males to avoid interspecific mating. Evolutionary Ecology. 25: 391-401
delBarco-Trillo J, Johnston RE. (2011) Avoidance of interspecific mating in female Syrian hamsters is stronger toward familiar than toward unfamiliar heterospecific males. Learning & Behavior. 39: 239-44
delBarco-Trillo J, McPhee ME, Johnston RE. (2011) Syrian hamster males below an age threshold do not elicit aggression from unfamiliar adult males. Aggressive Behavior. 37: 91-7
Larimer SC, Fritzsche P, Song Z, et al. (2011) Foraging behavior of golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) in the wild Journal of Ethology. 29: 275-283
Delbarco-Trillo J, Johnston RE. (2011) Effect of losing a fight on later agonistic behavior toward unfamiliar conspecifics in male Syrian hamsters Current Zoology. 57: 449-452
Delbarco-Trillo J, McPhee ME, Johnston RE. (2010) Adult female hamsters avoid interspecific mating after exposure to heterospecific males. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 64: 1247-1253
See more...