Claudia Carello

Affiliations: 
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States 
Area:
Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology
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"Claudia Carello"
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Publications

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Kim S, Carello C, Turvey MT. (2016) Size and Distance Are Perceived Independently in an Optical Tunnel: Evidence for Direct Perception. Vision Research
Abdolvahab M, Carello C. (2015) Functional distance in human gait transition. Acta Psychologica. 161: 170-6
Abdolvahab M, Carello C, Pinto C, et al. (2015) Symmetry and order parameter dynamics of the human odometer. Biological Cybernetics. 109: 63-73
Palatinus Z, Kelty-Stephen DG, Kinsella-Shaw J, et al. (2014) Haptic perceptual intent in quiet standing affects multifractal scaling of postural fluctuations. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance. 40: 1808-18
Kinsella-Shaw JM, Harrison SJ, Carello C, et al. (2013) Laterality of quiet standing in old and young. Experimental Brain Research. 231: 383-96
Lee Y, Moreno MA, Carello C, et al. (2013) Do phonological constraints on the spoken word affect visual lexical decision? Journal of Psycholinguistic Research. 42: 191-204
Isenhower RW, Frank TD, Kay BA, et al. (2012) Capturing and quantifying the dynamics of valenced emotions and valenced events of the organism-environment system. Nonlinear Dynamics, Psychology, and Life Sciences. 16: 397-427
Lee Y, Lee S, Carello C, et al. (2012) An archer's perceived form scales the "hitableness" of archery targets. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance. 38: 1125-31
Turvey MT, Harrison SJ, Frank TD, et al. (2012) Human odometry verifies the symmetry perspective on bipedal gaits. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance. 38: 1014-25
Isenhower RW, Kant V, Frank TD, et al. (2012) Equivalence of human odometry by walk and run is indifferent to self-selected speed. Journal of Motor Behavior. 44: 47-52
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