Elizabeth McDevitt

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2012-2017 Psychology University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States 
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Naji M, Krishnan GP, McDevitt EA, et al. (2019) Timing between Cortical Slow Oscillations and Heart Rate Bursts during Sleep Predicts Temporal Processing Speed, but Not Offline Consolidation. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 1-7
Naji M, Krishnan GP, McDevitt EA, et al. (2018) Coupling of autonomic and central events during sleep benefits declarative memory consolidation. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
McDevitt EA, Sattari N, Duggan KA, et al. (2018) The impact of frequent napping and nap practice on sleep-dependent memory in humans. Scientific Reports. 8: 15053
Schapiro AC, McDevitt EA, Rogers TT, et al. (2018) Human hippocampal replay during rest prioritizes weakly learned information and predicts memory performance. Nature Communications. 9: 3920
Yetton BD, McDevitt EA, Cellini N, et al. (2018) Quantifying sleep architecture dynamics and individual differences using big data and Bayesian networks. Plos One. 13: e0194604
Ahmadi M, McDevitt EA, Silver MA, et al. (2017) Perceptual learning induces changes in early and late visual evoked potentials. Vision Research
Schapiro AC, McDevitt EA, Chen L, et al. (2017) Sleep Benefits Memory for Semantic Category Structure While Preserving Exemplar-Specific Information. Scientific Reports. 7: 14869
Mednick SC, Sattari N, McDevitt EA, et al. (2017) The Effect of Sex and Menstrual Phase on Memory Formation during Nap. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Duggan KA, McDevitt EA, Whitehurst LN, et al. (2016) To Nap, Perchance to DREAM: A Factor Analysis of College Students' Self-Reported Reasons for Napping. Behavioral Sleep Medicine. 1-19
Whitehurst LN, Cellini N, McDevitt EA, et al. (2016) Autonomic activity during sleep predicts memory consolidation in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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