Robert W Wiley, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
2019- Psychology University of North Carolina - Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, United States 
Area:
Written language, visual perception, spelling, aphasia, dysgraphia
Website:
http://writingbrain.blog
Google:
"https://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=_WJiEC8AAAAJ"
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Parents

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Soojin J. Park grad student 2012-2018 Johns Hopkins
Brenda Rapp grad student 2012-2018 Johns Hopkins
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Publications

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Wiley RW, Rapp B. (2021) The Effects of Handwriting Experience on Literacy Learning. Psychological Science. 956797621993111
Shea J, Wiley R, Moss N, et al. (2020) Pseudoword spelling ability predicts response to word spelling treatment in acquired dysgraphia. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. 1-37
Wiley RW, Rapp B. (2019) Statistical analysis in Small-N Designs: using linear mixed-effects modeling for evaluating intervention effectiveness. Aphasiology. 33: 1-30
Purcell JJ, Wiley RW, Rapp B. (2019) Re-learning to be different: Increased neural differentiation supports post-stroke language recovery. Neuroimage. 116145
Neophytou K, Wiley RW, Rapp B, et al. (2019) The use of spelling for variant classification in primary progressive aphasia: Theoretical and practical implications. Neuropsychologia. 107157
Rapp B, Wiley RW. (2019) Re-learning and remembering in the lesioned brain. Neuropsychologia. 107126
Wiley R, Moss N, Shea J, et al. (2019) Pseudoword spelling ability predicts responsiveness to treatment for spelling words Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 13
Rapp B, Shea J, Petrozzino G, et al. (2019) Left Perisylvian Cortex Damage Selectively Impairs Pseudoword Spelling. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 13
Wiley RW, Rapp B. (2018) From complexity to distinctiveness: The effect of expertise on letter perception. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Dickerson N, Wiley R, Higgins J, et al. (2018) Is resting state fMRI activity sensitive to the severity of acquired language impairments? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 12
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