Paul Berg

Affiliations: 
1955-1959 Washington University, Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO 
 1959-2000 Biochemistry Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 
Area:
molecular biology of disease
Website:
http://nobelprize.org/chemistry/laureates/1980/berg-autobio.html
Google:
"Paul Berg"
Bio:

http://www.nasonline.org/member-directory/members/57784.html
http://www.asbmb.org/uploadedfiles/aboutus/asbmb_history/past_presidents/1970s/1975Berg.html
http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/CD/p-nid/257
http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/CD/p-nid/258
http://berg-emeritusprofessor.stanford.edu/BergLabAlumni.html
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1980 was divided, one half awarded to Paul Berg "for his fundamental studies of the biochemistry of nucleic acids, with particular regard to recombinant-DNA", the other half jointly to Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger "for their contributions concerning the determination of base sequences in nucleic acids".

Mean distance: 14.72 (cluster 28)
 
SNBCP
Cross-listing: Chemistry Tree

Parents

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Harland G. Wood grad student 1952 Case Western (Chemistry Tree)
 (A Study of the Conversion of Formate to Labile Methyl Groups)
Herman M. Kalckar post-doc 1952-1953 Københavns Universitet (Chemistry Tree)
Arthur Kornberg post-doc 1953-1954 Washington University (Computational Biology Tree)

Children

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Roger D. Kornberg research assistant Stanford Medical School (Chemistry Tree)
Richard Calendar grad student Stanford (Evolution Tree)
Edward James Ofengand grad student 1959 Washington University (Chemistry Tree)
Michael J. Chamberlin grad student 1963 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
William Bill Barry Wood grad student 1963 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
William R. Folk grad student 1971 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Paul Primakoff grad student 1972 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Janet E. Mertz grad student 1975 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Stephen Goff grad student 1978 Stanford
Richard Mulligan grad student 1981 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Michael E. Fromm grad student 1983 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Juergen Reichardt grad student 1989 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Maria Jasin post-doc Stanford (Cell Biology Tree)
Uriel Z. Littauer post-doc Stanford Medical School (Chemistry Tree)
Jack Preiss post-doc 1959 Washington University (Chemistry Tree)
Karl H. Muench post-doc 1961-1965 Stanford Medical School (Chemistry Tree)
Charles Whitacre Hill post-doc 1968 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
Thomas E. Shenk post-doc 1973-1975 Stanford (Cell Biology Tree)
Gilbert Chu post-doc 1984-1986 Stanford Medical School (Chemistry Tree)
Robert F. Margolskee post-doc 1983-1987
Robert Henry Symons research scientist 1971 Stanford (Chemistry Tree)
BETA: Related publications

Publications

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Baltimore D, Berg P, Botchan M, et al. (2015) Biotechnology. A prudent path forward for genomic engineering and germline gene modification. Science (New York, N.Y.). 348: 36-8
Berg P. (2014) Fred Sanger: a memorial tribute. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 111: 883-4
Berg P. (2013) Robert Joy Glaser 11 September 1918 - 7 June 2012. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 157: 465-9
Berg P. (2012) The dual-use conundrum. Science (New York, N.Y.). 337: 1273
Nautiyal S, Carlton VE, Lu Y, et al. (2010) High-throughput method for analyzing methylation of CpGs in targeted genomic regions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 107: 12587-92
Berg P, Mertz JE. (2010) Personal reflections on the origins and emergence of recombinant DNA technology. Genetics. 184: 9-17
Berg P. (2008) Meetings that changed the world: Asilomar 1975: DNA modification secured. Nature. 455: 290-1
Berg P. (2008) Moments of discovery. Annual Review of Biochemistry. 77: 15-44
Berg P, Lehman IR. (2007) Retrospective: Arthur Kornberg (1918-2007). Science (New York, N.Y.). 318: 1564
Berg P. (2006) Origins of the human genome project: why sequence the human genome when 96% of it is junk? American Journal of Human Genetics. 79: 603-5
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