Kristin R. Ratliff

Affiliations: 
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 
Area:
Spatial Cognition, Cognitive Development
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"Kristin Ratliff"
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Parents

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Nora S. Newcombe grad student 2002-2007 Temple University
 (Evidence for an adaptive combination model of human spatial reorientation.)
Susan  Cohen Levine post-doc 2008-2010 Chicago
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Publications

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Frazier TW, Ratliff KR, Gruber C, et al. (2014) Confirmatory factor analytic structure and measurement invariance of quantitative autistic traits measured by the social responsiveness scale-2. Autism : the International Journal of Research and Practice. 18: 31-44
Lyons IM, Huttenlocher J, Ratliff KR. (2014) The Influence of Cue Reliability and Cue Representation on Spatial Reorientation in Young Children Journal of Cognition and Development. 15: 402-413
Levine SC, Ratliff KR, Huttenlocher J, et al. (2012) Early puzzle play: a predictor of preschoolers' spatial transformation skill. Developmental Psychology. 48: 530-42
Newcombe NS, Ratliff KR. (2012) Explaining the Development of Spatial Reorientation: Modularity-Plus-Language versus the Emergence of Adaptive Combination The Emerging Spatial Mind
Newcombe NS, Ratliff KR, Shallcross WL, et al. (2010) Young children's use of features to reorient is more than just associative: further evidence against a modular view of spatial processing. Developmental Science. 13: 213-20
Ratliff KR, Newcombe NS. (2008) Reorienting when cues conflict: evidence for an adaptive-combination view. Psychological Science. 19: 1301-7
Ratliff KR, Newcombe NS. (2008) Is language necessary for human spatial reorientation? Reconsidering evidence from dual task paradigms. Cognitive Psychology. 56: 142-63
Newcombe NS, Lloyd ME, Ratliff KR. (2007) Development of episodic and autobiographical memory: a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Advances in Child Development and Behavior. 35: 37-85
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