Atsunori Ariga

Affiliations: 
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL 
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"Atsunori Ariga"
Mean distance: 17.04 (cluster 15)
 
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Publications

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Sasaki K, Ariga A, Watanabe K. (2020) Spatial congruency bias in identifying objects is triggered by retinal position congruence: Examination using the Ternus-Pikler illusion. Scientific Reports. 10: 4630
Yoshimura N, Yonemitsu F, Marmolejo-Ramos F, et al. (2019) Task Difficulty Modulates the Disrupting Effects of Oral Respiration on Visual Search Performance. Journal of Cognition. 2: 21
Takao S, Yamani Y, Ariga A. (2017) The Gaze-Cueing Effect in the United States and Japan: Influence of Cultural Differences in Cognitive Strategies on Control of Attention. Frontiers in Psychology. 8: 2343
Ariga A, Yamada Y, Yamani Y. (2016) Early Visual Perception Potentiated by Object Affordances: Evidence From a Temporal Order Judgment Task. I-Perception. 7: 2041669516666550
Yamani Y, Ariga A, Yamada Y. (2015) Object Affordances Potentiate Responses but Do Not Guide Attentional Prioritization. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience. 9: 74
Lauer JE, Udelson HB, Jeon SO, et al. (2015) An early sex difference in the relation between mental rotation and object preference. Frontiers in Psychology. 6: 558
Ariga A. (2015) Insightful problem solving can be manipulated by social reality Proceedings of the 2015-7th International Conference On Knowledge and Smart Technology, Kst 2015. 161-164
Suzuki K, Aoki S, Ariga A, et al. (2015) Measurement of the muon beam direction and muon flux for the T2K neutrino experiment Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics. 2015
Ariga A. (2013) [Facilitation and inhibition of insightful problem solving based on social comparison]. Shinrigaku Kenkyu : the Japanese Journal of Psychology. 83: 576-81
Ariga A, Lleras A. (2011) Brief and rare mental "breaks" keep you focused: deactivation and reactivation of task goals preempt vigilance decrements. Cognition. 118: 439-43
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