Daniel T. Smith, Ph.D

Affiliations: 
Psychology Durham University, Durham, England, United Kingdom 
Area:
Attention, Eye-movements, Neurorehabilitation, Motivation
Website:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/psychology/staff/?id=2836
Google:
"Daniel T. Smith"
Bio:

http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=wFAqIX8AAAAJ&hl=en

Mean distance: 16.18 (cluster 23)
 
SNBCP

Parents

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Stephen R. Jackson grad student 2001-2004 Nottingham
 (Thesis: THE ROLE OF INTENDED EYE-MOVEMENTS IN ORIENTING ATTENTION)
Chris Rorden grad student 2001-2004 Nottingham
Thomas Schenk post-doc 2004-2007 Durham University

Children

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Stephen Dunne grad student 2010-2014 Durham University
Lina Aimola post-doc 2008-2011 Durham University
Keira Ball post-doc 2011-2012 Durham University
BETA: Related publications

Publications

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Dunne S, Ellison A, Smith DT. (2019) The Limitations of Reward Effects on Saccade Latencies: An Exploration of Task-Specificity and Strength. Vision (Basel, Switzerland). 3
Morgan EJ, Freeth M, Smith DT. (2018) Mental State Attributions Mediate the Gaze Cueing Effect. Vision (Basel, Switzerland). 2
Knight HC, Smith DT, Knight DC, et al. (2018) Light social drinkers are more distracted by irrelevant information from an induced attentional bias than heavy social drinkers. Psychopharmacology
Smith DT, Ball K, Swalwell R, et al. (2016) Reprint of: Object-based attentional facilitation and inhibition are neuropsychologically dissociated. Neuropsychologia
Cole GG, Atkinson M, Le AT, et al. (2016) Do humans spontaneously take the perspective of others? Acta Psychologica. 164: 165-168
Smith DT, Ball K, Swalwell R, et al. (2015) Object-based attentional facilitation and inhibition are neuropsychologically dissociated. Neuropsychologia
Dunne S, Ellison A, Smith DT. (2015) Rewards modulate saccade latency but not exogenous spatial attention. Frontiers in Psychology. 6: 1080
Knight HC, Smith DT, Knight DC, et al. (2015) Altering attentional control settings causes persistent biases of visual attention. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006). 1-21
Cole GG, Smith DT, Atkinson MA. (2015) Mental state attribution and the gaze cueing effect. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. 77: 1105-15
Smith D. (2015) The oxford handbook of attention Perception. 44: 107-109
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