Susan E. Brennan

Affiliations: 
Psychology Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, United States 
Area:
psychology of language use
Website:
http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/sbrennan-/
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"Susan E. Brennan"
Mean distance: 16.18 (cluster 23)
 
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Publications

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Galati A, Brennan SE. (2021) What is retained about common ground? Distinct effects of linguistic and visual co-presence. Cognition. 215: 104809
Kuhlen AK, Bogler C, Brennan SE, et al. (2017) Brains in dialogue: decoding neural preparation of speaking to a conversational partner. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Horton WS, Brennan SE. (2016) The Role of Metarepresentation in the Production and Resolution of Referring Expressions. Frontiers in Psychology. 7: 1111
Galati A, Brennan SE. (2015) Speakers adapt gestures to addressees’ knowledge: Implications for models of co-speech gesture Language, Cognition and Neuroscience. 29: 435-451
Hwang J, Brennan SE, Huffman MK. (2015) Phonetic adaptation in non-native spoken dialogue: Effects of priming and audience design Journal of Memory and Language. 81: 72-90
Kuhlen AK, Brennan SE. (2013) Language in dialogue: when confederates might be hazardous to your data. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. 20: 54-72
Neider MB, Chen X, Dickinson CA, et al. (2010) Coordinating spatial referencing using shared gaze. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. 17: 718-24
Kuhlen AK, Brennan SE. (2010) Anticipating distracted addressees: How speakers' expectations and addressees' feedback influence storytelling Discourse Processes. 47: 567-587
Brennan SE, Galati A, Kuhlen AK. (2010) Chapter 8 - Two Minds, One Dialog: Coordinating Speaking and Understanding Psychology of Learning and Motivation. 53: 301-344
Galati A, Brennan SE. (2010) Attenuating information in spoken communication: For the speaker, or for the addressee? Journal of Memory and Language. 62: 35-51
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