Greg Huffman

Affiliations: 
University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, United States 
Area:
cognition, vision, visual attention, selective attention, perception and action
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Publications

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Huffman G, Brockmole JR. (2020) Attentional selection is biased towards controllable stimuli. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Huffman G, Hilchey MD, Weidler BJ, et al. (2020) Does feature-based attention play a role in the episodic retrieval of event files? Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance. 46: 241-251
Huffman G, Hilchey MD, Pratt J. (2018) Feature integration in basic detection and localization tasks: Insights from the attentional orienting literature. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Huffman G, Gozli DG, Hommel B, et al. (2018) Response preparation, response selection difficulty, and response-outcome learning. Psychological Research
Constable MD, Welsh T, Pratt J, et al. (2018) Author accepted manuscript: I before U: Temporal order judgements reveal bias for self-owned objects. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006). 1747021818762010
Huffman G, Antinucci VM, Pratt J. (2018) The illusion of control: Sequential dependencies underlie contingent attentional capture. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Hilchey MD, Rajsic J, Huffman G, et al. (2018) Dissociating Orienting Biases From Integration Effects With Eye Movements. Psychological Science. 956797617734021
Huffman G, Rajsic J, Pratt J. (2017) Ironic capture: top-down expectations exacerbate distraction in visual search. Psychological Research
Huffman G, Pratt J. (2017) The action effect: Support for the biased competition hypothesis. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Hilchey MD, Rajsic J, Huffman G, et al. (2017) Intervening response events between identification targets do not always turn repetition benefits into repetition costs. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
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