Ben J. Arthur

Affiliations: 
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States 
Area:
sound localization
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"Ben Arthur"
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Publications

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Neunuebel JP, Taylor AL, Arthur BJ, et al. (2015) Female mice ultrasonically interact with males during courtship displays. Elife. 4
Arthur BJ, Emr KS, Wyttenbach RA, et al. (2014) Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) flight tones: frequency, harmonicity, spherical spreading, and phase relationships. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 135: 933-41
Arthur BJ, Sunayama-Morita T, Coen P, et al. (2013) Multi-channel acoustic recording and automated analysis of Drosophila courtship songs. Bmc Biology. 11: 11
Cator LJ, Arthur BJ, Ponlawat A, et al. (2011) Behavioral observations and sound recordings of free-flight mating swarms of Ae. Aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand. Journal of Medical Entomology. 48: 941-6
Menda G, Bar HY, Arthur BJ, et al. (2011) Classical conditioning through auditory stimuli in Drosophila: methods and models. The Journal of Experimental Biology. 214: 2864-70
Ratcliffe JM, Fullard JH, Arthur BJ, et al. (2011) Adaptive auditory risk assessment in the dogbane tiger moth when pursued by bats. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 278: 364-70
Arthur BJ, Wyttenbach RA, Harrington LC, et al. (2010) Neural responses to one- and two-tone stimuli in the hearing organ of the dengue vector mosquito. The Journal of Experimental Biology. 213: 1376-85
Ratcliffe JM, Fullard JH, Arthur BJ, et al. (2009) Tiger moths and the threat of bats: decision-making based on the activity of a single sensory neuron. Biology Letters. 5: 368-71
Cator LJ, Arthur BJ, Harrington LC, et al. (2009) Harmonic convergence in the love songs of the dengue vector mosquito. Science (New York, N.Y.). 323: 1077-9
Arthur BJ, Hoy RR. (2006) The ability of the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea to distinguish sounds in the vertical plane. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 120: 1546-9
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