Ruediger Klein

Affiliations: 
Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Jupiter, FL, United States 
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"Ruediger Klein"
Mean distance: 15.41 (cluster 11)
 
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Publications

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Gaitanos T, Dudanova I, Sakkou M, et al. (2015) The Eph receptor family Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Family and Subfamilies. 165-264
Gatto G, Morales D, Kania A, et al. (2014) EphA4 receptor shedding regulates spinal motor axon guidance. Current Biology : Cb. 24: 2355-65
Serradj N, Paixão S, Sobocki T, et al. (2014) EphA4-mediated ipsilateral corticospinal tract misprojections are necessary for bilateral voluntary movements but not bilateral stereotypic locomotion. The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society For Neuroscience. 34: 5211-21
Klein P, Müller-Rischart AK, Motori E, et al. (2014) Ret rescues mitochondrial morphology and muscle degeneration of Drosophila Pink1 mutants. The Embo Journal. 33: 341-55
Gatto G, Dudanova I, Suetterlin P, et al. (2013) Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O inhibits trigeminal axon growth and branching by repressing TrkB and Ret signaling. The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society For Neuroscience. 33: 5399-410
Klein R. (2012) Eph/ephrin signalling during development Development (Cambridge). 139: 4105-4109
Yamagishi S, Hampel F, Hata K, et al. (2011) FLRT2 and FLRT3 act as repulsive guidance cues for Unc5-positive neurons. The Embo Journal. 30: 2920-33
Filosa A, Paixão S, Honsek SD, et al. (2009) Neuron-glia communication via EphA4/ephrin-A3 modulates LTP through glial glutamate transport. Nature Neuroscience. 12: 1285-92
Egea J, Erlacher C, Montanez E, et al. (2008) Genetic ablation of FLRT3 reveals a novel morphogenetic function for the anterior visceral endoderm in suppressing mesoderm differentiation. Genes & Development. 22: 3349-62
Ke Y, Zhang EE, Hagihara K, et al. (2007) Deletion of Shp2 in the brain leads to defective proliferation and differentiation in neural stem cells and early postnatal lethality. Molecular and Cellular Biology. 27: 6706-17
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