Julian Jara-Ettinger

Affiliations: 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States 
Area:
Theory of Mind
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"Julian Jara-Ettinger"
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Parents

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Laura E. Schulz grad student 2011- MIT
Joshua Tenenbaum grad student 2011- MIT
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Publications

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Jara-Ettinger J, Schulz LE, Tenenbaum JB. (2020) The Naïve Utility Calculus as a unified, quantitative framework for action understanding. Cognitive Psychology. 123: 101334
Sheskin M, Scott K, Mills CM, et al. (2020) Online Developmental Science to Foster Innovation, Access, and Impact. Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Bridgers S, Jara-Ettinger J, Gweon H. (2019) Young children consider the expected utility of others' learning to decide what to teach. Nature Human Behaviour
Jara-Ettinger J, Floyd S, Huey H, et al. (2019) Social Pragmatics: Preschoolers Rely on Commonsense Psychology to Resolve Referential Underspecification. Child Development
Jara-Ettinger J, Sun F, Schulz L, et al. (2018) Sensitivity to the Sampling Process Emerges From the Principle of Efficiency. Cognitive Science
Jara-Ettinger J, Floyd S, Tenenbaum JB, et al. (2017) Children Understand That Agents Maximize Expected Utilities. Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
Jara-Ettinger J, Gweon H, Schulz LE, et al. (2016) The Naïve Utility Calculus: Computational Principles Underlying Commonsense Psychology: (Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20, 589-604; July 19, 2016). Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Jara-Ettinger J, Gweon H, Schulz LE, et al. (2016) The Naïve Utility Calculus: Computational Principles Underlying Commonsense Psychology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Jara-Ettinger J, Gibson E, Kidd C, et al. (2015) Native Amazonian children forego egalitarianism in merit-based tasks when they learn to count. Developmental Science
Jara-Ettinger J, Tenenbaum JB, Schulz LE. (2015) Not so innocent: toddlers' inferences about costs and culpability. Psychological Science. 26: 633-40
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