Alice Mado Proverbio

Affiliations: 
University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Lombardia, Italy 
Area:
Cognitive Neuroscience: Attention
Google:
"Alice Proverbio"
Mean distance: 14.71 (cluster 15)
 
SNBCP
Cross-listing: SPRtree

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Publications

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Proverbio AM, Massetti G, Rizzi E, et al. (2016) Skilled musicians are not subject to the McGurk effect. Scientific Reports. 6: 30423
Proverbio AM, Manfrin L, Arcari LA, et al. (2015) Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia) in response to atonal music. Frontiers in Psychology. 6: 1646
Proverbio AM, Gabaro V, Orlandi A, et al. (2015) Semantic brain areas are involved in gesture comprehension: An electrical neuroimaging study. Brain and Language. 147: 30-40
Proverbio AM, Attardo L, Cozzi M, et al. (2015) The effect of musical practice on gesture/sound pairing. Frontiers in Psychology. 6: 376
Zani A, Marsili G, Senerchia A, et al. (2015) ERP signs of categorical and supra-categorical processing of visual information. Biological Psychology. 104: 90-107
Proverbio AM, Gabaro V, Orlandi A, et al. (2015) Semantic brain areas are involved in gesture comprehension: An electrical neuroimaging study Brain and Language. 147: 30-40
Proverbio AM, Calbi M, Manfredi M, et al. (2014) Audio-visuomotor processing in the musician's brain: an ERP study on professional violinists and clarinetists. Scientific Reports. 4: 5866
Manfredi M, Adorni R, Proverbio AM, et al. (2014) Why do we laugh at misfortunes? An electrophysiological exploration of comic situation processing. Neuropsychologia. 61: 324-34
Adorni R, Manfredi M, Proverbio AM. (2014) Electro-cortical manifestations of common vs. proper name processing during reading. Brain and Language. 135: 1-8
Peltola MJ, Yrttiaho S, Puura K, et al. (2014) Motherhood and oxytocin receptor genetic variation are associated with selective changes in electrocortical responses to infant facial expressions. Emotion (Washington, D.C.). 14: 469-77
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