Silke Kipper, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany 
Google:
"Silke Kipper"
Mean distance: 15.66 (cluster 10)
 
SNBCP
Cross-listing: CSD Tree

Parents

Sign in to add mentor
Dietmar Todt grad student (CSD Tree)
Stephen Nowicki post-doc 2004-2005 Duke
BETA: Related publications

Publications

You can help our author matching system! If you notice any publications incorrectly attributed to this author, please sign in and mark matches as correct or incorrect.

Bartsch C, Weiss M, Kipper S. (2015) Multiple song features are related to paternal effort in common nightingales. Bmc Evolutionary Biology. 15: 115
Honarmand M, Thompson CK, Schatton A, et al. (2015) Early developmental stress negatively affects neuronal recruitment to avian song system nucleus HVC. Developmental Neurobiology
Kipper S, Kiefer S, Bartsch C, et al. (2015) Female calling? Song responses to conspecific call playbacks in nightingales, Luscinia megarhynchos Animal Behaviour. 100: 60-66
Kiefer S, Scharff C, Hultsch H, et al. (2014) Learn it now, sing it later? Field and laboratory studies on song repertoire acquisition and song use in nightingales. Die Naturwissenschaften. 101: 955-63
Weiss M, Hultsch H, Adam I, et al. (2014) The use of network analysis to study complex animal communication systems: a study on nightingale song. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 281: 20140460
Brendler C, Kipper S, Schrader L. (2014) Vigilance and roosting behaviour of laying hens on different perch heights Applied Animal Behaviour Science. 157: 93-99
Bessert-Nettelbeck M, Kipper S, Bartsch C, et al. (2014) Similar, yet different: Male Reed Buntings (Emberiza schoeniclus) show high individual differences in song composition, rates of syllable sharing and use Journal of Ornithology. 155: 689-700
Bartsch C, Wenchel R, Kaiser A, et al. (2014) Singing onstage: Female and male common nightingales eavesdrop on song type matching Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 68: 1163-1171
Vokurková J, Petrusková T, Reifová R, et al. (2013) The causes and evolutionary consequences of mixed singing in two hybridizing songbird species (Luscinia spp.). Plos One. 8: e60172
Apfelbeck B, Mortega KG, Kiefer S, et al. (2013) Life-history and hormonal control of aggression in black redstarts: Blocking testosterone does not decrease territorial aggression, but changes the emphasis of vocal behaviours during simulated territorial intrusions. Frontiers in Zoology. 10: 8
See more...