Eiling Yee

Affiliations: 
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States 
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"Eiling Yee"
Mean distance: 14.46 (cluster 15)
 
SNBCP

Children

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Jovana Pejovic grad student

Collaborators

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Daniel M. Drucker collaborator 2005-2009 Penn
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Publications

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Yee E, Thompson-Schill SL. (2016) Putting concepts into context. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
White KS, Yee E, Blumstein SE, et al. (2013) Adults show less sensitivity to phonetic detail in unfamiliar words, too. Journal of Memory and Language. 68: 362-378
Yee E, Chrysikou EG, Hoffman E, et al. (2013) Manual experience shapes object representations. Psychological Science. 24: 909-19
Yee E, Ahmed SZ, Thompson-Schill SL. (2012) Colorless green ideas (can) prime furiously. Psychological Science. 23: 364-9
Yee E, Huffstetler S, Thompson-Schill SL. (2011) Function follows form: activation of shape and function features during object identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology. General. 140: 348-63
Mirman D, Yee E, Blumstein SE, et al. (2011) Theories of spoken word recognition deficits in aphasia: evidence from eye-tracking and computational modeling. Brain and Language. 117: 53-68
Myung JY, Blumstein SE, Yee E, et al. (2010) Impaired access to manipulation features in Apraxia: evidence from eyetracking and semantic judgment tasks. Brain and Language. 112: 101-12
Yee E, Drucker DM, Thompson-Schill SL. (2010) fMRI-adaptation evidence of overlapping neural representations for objects related in function or manipulation. Neuroimage. 50: 753-63
Yee E, Overton E, Thompson-Schill SL. (2009) Looking for meaning: eye movements are sensitive to overlapping semantic features, not association. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. 16: 869-74
Yee E, Blumstein SE, Sedivy JC. (2008) Lexical-semantic activation in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia: evidence from eye movements. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 20: 592-612
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